$1.3-million Berkeley house severs its questionable Julia Morgan ties, switches into contract

Photo: MLS Photo 1 of / 13 Caption Close Photo 2 of 13 The sloping yard The sloping yard Photo: MLS Photo 3 of 13 The sloping yard The sloping yard Photo: MLS Photo 4 of 13 Kitchen and dining area/spouse and children room Kitchen and dining area/family room Photo: MLS Photo 5 of 13 Dining area/family room Dining area/family room Photo: MLS Photo 6 of 13 Living place with fireplace Living place with fireplace Photo: MLS Photo 7 of 13 Fittings removed by the prior owners. Fittings removed by the prior owners. Photo: MLS Photo 8 of 13 Kitchen countertop and components removed by the prior owners. Kitchen countertop and components removed by the prior owners. Photo: MLS Photo 9 of 13 Bath room with missing ceiling Bath room with missing ceiling Photo: MLS Photo 10 of 13 Upstairs full bath in classic condition Upstairs complete bath in original condition Photo: MLS Image 11 of 13 One of two bedrooms One of two bedrooms Photo: MLS Photo 12 of 13 The backyard The backyard Photo: MLS Photo 13 of 13 $1.3-million Berkeley home severs its questionable Julia Morgan ties, switches into contract 1 / 13 Back again to Gallery

We recently brought you the storyline of a largely original-condition century-old home in Berkeley that claimed both Julia Morgan and Edna Deakin were its architects, even though the neighborhood historical society‘s data listed only Deakin while the designer.

Since the story ran, the home’s agent, Galina Plizga has taken out Morgan’s name from all of the marketing components and offered a mea culpa for the erroneous info.

“Julia Morgan was not officially involved,”Plizga said, adding that she got the Morgan connection from “not reliable info on the web.”

Plizga apologized for the blunder and said that Deakin, who most famously redesigned Berkeley’s Temple of Wings, was “talented and innovative” in her own ideal.

Clearly, a buyer agreed for the reason that house (that was asking $1.3 million) recently went into contract. Plizga says the customer has been informed that the house was not designed by Morgan and he possesses chosen to go ahead with the sale in any case.

The house is a foreclosure and being sold in “as-is” condition, with a kitchen where the countertop and cabinet hardware were removed by the prior owner, a bathroom without ceiling, plus some wood-rotted window frames, among different needed fixes.

Plizga says that despite these issues, local specialists say the 1,700-square-foot home could be brought back to its previous grandeur.

“A neighbor suggested a local architect from Berkeley who’s the fourth generation working there,” she said. “He explained that the house could be restored and will shine again as a shining gem.”

Emily Landes is a article writer and editor who’s obsessed with all things real estate.

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